The Groves Builder Series: Highland Homes

Highland Homes was founded in 1985 and has grown to a production of over 2800 homes a year in Houston, Austin, Dallas-Fort Worth and San Antonio. Highland offers homes in many Houston area neighborhoods, including 18 of their varied yet equally beautiful home plans available to buyers in The Groves. Highland Homes’ high standards of quality and customer satisfaction have been recognized across the industry. Highland earned a spot in the top 20 of the “The Builder 100 List” by J.D. Power and Associates and was also named the People’s Choice Builder of the Year five consecutive times. Highland offers 60 foot lots in the Groves with homes ranging from 2,400 to 3,700 square feet. Prices range from the $320s to $400s for these impeccable homes. Highland’s current inventory and available floor plans can be viewed here. If you are considering building a home, now is the time to get started. Start now and be in before the new school year begins. Let us help you find your home in a neighborhood that suits every family’s needs and...

The Groves Builder Series: Village Builders

It is said practice makes perfect and Village Builders has been perfecting their craft for more than 40 years. Village Builders began in Houston and quickly became one of the premier names among builders in the area leading to their expansion into the Austin, Dallas and San Antonio markets. Village unveiled the Heartland Collection in The Groves, a series compromised of their signature architectural details and classic appeal. These homes start in the low $300s and range from 2300 to 3350 square feet. Village Builders is also known for its feature packages which can be inquired about at the model. Buyers in The Groves have nine beautiful and well thought out plans to choose from, allowing each client to find a floor plan suited to their needs. Their nine plans can be viewed online here. If a pre-built home suits your wants or needs more, take a look at their current inventory of move-in ready homes on the “Quick Move-in Homes” tab. Give us a call today so we can schedule your visit to The Groves and to tour these beautiful...

What a Home Buyer Wants

When someone is selling a home, it is easy to get sentimental about it and to take rejection rather personally when someone chooses not to buy.  However, to the potential home buyer, the house is merely a commodity.  They have not built memories in it yet.  They are not personally attached to it the way the seller is.  And they are not looking at the sellers’ decorating taste or the work put into building that deck or game room in the same way the seller is.  This can be difficult to remember, but to a buyer, only three main factors predict whether or not they decide to buy: price, condition, and location. Price.  Research needs to be done to find out whether the home is in a buyers’ or sellers’ market.  It is important for a seller to remember that the potential buyers have access to the current market information just as the sellers do.  While it may be tempting to ask for a higher price because of how much a seller personally values a home and what it means to him or her on an emotional level, this could result in an inability to sell.  Stay within the confines of the current market for that area, and try to keep emotion out of it. Condition.  Many condition issues are easy to fix and don’t cost much, if anything, to accomplish.  Make sure the yard is mowed and any landscaping looks tidy, the paint is clean and fresh-looking, the floors are clean and not outdated, the walls are not outdated in terms of color or wallpaper patterns, and that...

Real Estate Statistics that May Surprise

The Chief Executive Officer Spencer Rascoff collected real estate statistics from his database at Zillow.com of 110 million homes to find trends in real-estate pricing.  Some of the findings were rather surprising. Homes with addresses on a “Way” sold for more than those on a “Street”, and named streets had about a two percent higher resale value than numbered streets, unless you are in NYC (where it made no difference), or the street is a Main Street, which sell for an average of four percent less. Further, streets with the words “Lake” or “Sunset” in them have about a 16% higher resale value than those that didn’t.  So, it appears that the name of the street actually makes a difference in what people are willing to pay. Numbers in addresses also make a difference. The number 7, for some reason, has an impact.  Houses with just a lone “7” sell for 1.8% higher than the estimated value, but “777” homes sell for 2.1% below.  And addresses that have other numbers but include “777” (like 17778) sell for 1.8% less.  So apparently three 7’s in a row is a turn-off. When you sell makes a difference in how long it will take to sell and how much you can get for it. In New York, at least, the worst time to sell is the second week of December and the best time to sell is March. Psychological pricing does in fact work. Having a nine in the thousand slot instead of a zero (449,000 vs. 450,000) actually does cause homes to sell four days to a week faster. The “Starbucks...

Color Can Make the Difference

Something as simple as color has a major effect on the feel of a room.  Often, when we feel that a place is either inviting or uncomfortable has something to do with the color scheme that is used there.  Colors have both a physiological and a psychological effect on us.  So, when you are picking out colors for your home, it is important to carefully consider not just how they look, but also how they make you feel. You can begin by picking out favorite colors from a piece of art, a rug, or a piece of furniture to be considered for either a main color or an accent color. Pick a small area, like a bathroom or entryway, to begin with. This way, if you decide you don’t like that color, you won’t have to redo a large space to change it. Consider the type of mood that you would like for that room to have. Pay attention to what kind of lighting that particular room has and adjust your colors accordingly. Natural lighting reflects a truer color, incandescent light brings out warmer and yellower tones, and fluorescent light casts a sharp blue tone.  Most paint stores have light boxes that you can use to test how a color will look in different types of light. Consider how the colors in adjacent rooms will mesh together. There needs to be some flow from one room to the next.  A color wheel is a useful tool for figuring out which colors work well together. If you are going for a more monochromatic look, try using either slightly different shades of...